Conservation Tree Nursery

Tree Nursery

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The MCSCD Conservation Tree Nursery provides private and public not-for-profit environmental groups and agencies with an affordable, convenient, and continuous source of native, non-invasive plant material for a variety of projects. Our trees are specially selected for their conservation value, such as wildlife habitat, stabilization, shade, pollutant removal, and fruiting. We also supply cuttings of various Willows and Dogwoods.

The majority of our inventory is native New Jersey wetland species, which are ideal for riparian restoration and wetland mitigation projects.

Material is available for pick up at our Morris Township facility and comes potted in 13 Gallon (#10) pots that are easy to move and store (2 people recommended for lifting). As a means of keeping our plant material affordable, we collect a $10 per pot deposit, which is refundable upon their return. Below are pictures of representative plants along with a general description. Click on the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Plant Profile link for an extensive species description.

If you have any questions about the Conservation Nursery Program, please do not hesitate to contact Joseph Dunn at (973) 285-8339 or via email.

Species Descriptions
(Click on Picture to Enlarge)

Fruiting trees & shrubs attract wildlife which aids in the dispersal of seeds.

Green Ash

Green Ash

Common Name: Green Ash
Scientific Name: Fraxinus pennsylvanica
Wetland Indicator: FACW
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 4

Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh., green ash, is a deciduous, medium-sized tree with an open, irregular crown reaching about 50 feet in height. Native to eastern North America and is fairly common west to Wyoming and Colorado along plains watercourses at elevations below 6,000 feet. The tree is fast growing on moist bottomlands, and is extremely hardy to climatic extremes once established.

Red Maple

Red Maple

Common Name: Red Maple
Scientific Name: Acer rubrum
Wetland Indicator: FAC
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 3

Acer rubrum L., red maple, is a wide-ranging native tree that is very well adapted to most soil and site conditions. This species is one of the early harbingers of fall as it turns color well in advance of other eastern deciduous trees, especially when it is located in wet sites. The fiery colors of fall are typically a brilliant red. Conversely, it is also one of the earliest flowering trees in the spring. This maple is a medium sized tree with fairly rapid growth (2-5 ft/yr).

Eastern Cottonwood

Eastern Cottonwood

Common Name: Eastern Cottonwood
Scientific Name: Populus deltoides
Wetland Indicator: FAC
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 2

Populus deltoids, eastern cottonwood, is a fast-growing tree which reaches 80 to l00 feet in height and 3 to 4 feet in diameter.

Nannyberry

Nannyberry

Common Name: Nannyberry
Scientific Name: Viburnum lentago
Wetland Indicator: FAC
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 7

Nannyberry is a native, deciduous, multi-stemmed shrub or small tree that may reach 36 ft. in height. The plant is also known as “sheepberry” because its fruit smells like wet sheep wool when over ripe. Nannyberry is leggy and somewhat open at maturity with an irregular to rounded crown. Suckers often form at the base. The bark is dark gray to black in a pattern of small blocks.

River Birch

River Birch

Common Name: River Birch
Scientific Name: Betula nigra
Wetland Indicator: FACW
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 7

River birch is native to the eastern United States and is restricted to stream banks and other moist places. The tree can grow as tall as 40 to 70 feet and 15 to 30 inches in diameter. The leaves are alternate, simple, 1-3 inches long, and oval-shaped with serrated edges; they are green above and whitish underneath. River birch bears an average of 375,000 seeds per pound. Root crowns and roots survive fire and sprout vigorously. The growth rate of river birch is typically 1.5 to 3 feet per year.

Arrowwood

Arrowwood

Common Name: Arrowwood
Scientific Name: Viburnum dentatum
Wetland Indicator: FAC
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 5

Arrowwood is a native shrub growing 3-9 feet tall and spreading sometimes up to 8 feet. The plant’s arching branches form an overall rounded crown; twigs are slender, ridged and angled. Foliage turns yellow to red or reddish-purple in late fall. Small white flowers are borne in 2 to 4-inch flat-topped clusters in May to early June. The ¼ inch berry-like drupes are bluish-black and attractive to wildlife. Fruiting occurs from August – November.

American Cranberrybush

American Cranberrybush

Common Name: American Cranberrybush
Scientific Name: Viburnum trilobum
Wetland Indicator: FACW
Plant Stewardship Index Coefficient of Conservatism: 6

Viburnum trilobum Marsh., American Cranberrybush is an erect native shrub, averaging in height from 6 to 10 feet, occasionally taller on good sites. The plants are multi-stemmed but do not form thickets by spreading. They are dense shrubs because of close branching. In the fall the leaves become scarlet. The creamy-white flowers, which appear in late May and early June, measure 3 to 4 inches across. The fruit, which ripens in September and October, resembles the true cranberry in size and color but is more translucent when ripe. Fruit hangs on the branches all winter.